Volvo S40 T5 – The Perfect Car For The Driver Who Wants A Manual

In the car community, having a car with a stick or being capable of driving a manual car, is an added bonus to show your knowledge and legitimacy as a car enthusiast. Often we discuss what car with a manual transmission would be perfect to learn and or own. The Mazda Miata is always brought up for many reasons, including the fact that it’s essentially a street legal go-kart which gives drivers the sensation of being connected to the road. There are many other candidates, but one that is never mentioned nor given credit as being a fun car is the Volvo S40 T5.

I know what you’re thinking, but much like the C30, the S40 can be fun to drive, and in fact could be the perfect car to learn how to drive a stick. Many S40 owners complain about the close proximity between the brake and gas pedals, as you’ll most likely accidentally tap on of them. This dilemma actually brings up the perfect opportunity to start heel-toeing, which will make you a better driver and help train you to shift through the gears smoother. The S40 T5 has other benefits as well, including performance and modification capabilities.

With a turbocharged 5 cylinder engine producing around 227 horsepower, you’re going to have a decent car right off the bat. It won’t beat a fully stock MazdaSpeed3 but you’ll have more horsepower than a stock Volkswagen GTI. This now leads up to modifications, and here are just a few S40s that are out there where the owners brought the Swedish sedan to the next level.

You can also go with body kits from Heico to add a more sporty appeal to the S40

volvo_new_03

Overall the S40 is a great car to start out with, whether to daily drive or learn how to drive a manual. It’s a safe car, the interior is cozy, and the seats are absolutely comfortable. Perfect for the driver who also wants to step into the entry level luxury segment. Despite not being a BMW, Audi, or Mercedes Benz, it’s definitely an alternative if you don’t want to buy a Japanese car, but with that does come costs at the repair shop.

Right now you can find S40 T5s around $5k – $6k. If you’re lucky enough to stumble upon an S40 T5 R-Design don’t pass it up. Not only are they rare to come by these days, but you get some added goodies in terms of aesthetics. They’re also holding their value slightly better and can be purchased for around $12k.

Most importantly, you’ll have a novelty car. Not many S40 T5’s are out there on the roads, let alone a modified one. It’s safe to say that at a local car meet, you’ll have the only S40, but it will be unique which just adds to the appeal and the whole package of owning one.

Volvo’s Plans Are Becoming Clearer, Ghent Factory Part Of Future

Owners of the Volvo S40 in the United States know that their Volvo didn’t come from Sweden, but that it was manufactured in Ghent, Belgium. Today, there are rumblings and rumors that the S40’s siblings will be coming to America by 2018, and yes, they’ll be manufactured in Ghent just like their predecessor. Motor Authority broke the news that the V40, which is already sold in Europe, should be landing on our shores later this decade, while also introducing the all new XC40. These two new models are just the tip of the iceberg for the Swedish automaker, as Volvo has a 5 year plan to take on other luxury brands in the United States.

With the news that Ghent will play a role in Volvo’s revival in the US, there’s also rumors that China might come into play, as Volvo still hasn’t given up on the idea of selling Chinese-made vehicles. So far it appears that Ghent is the top priority. With that being said, Volvo is also building a new plant in the United States, possibly manufacturing the larger models, but no official word as of today.

Volvo’s other plans consist of new changes to the S60/V60 and XC60, introducing their new flagship, the S90/V90, and discontinuing the S80. With their German counterparts grabbing market share and continuously adding on to their lineups, Volvo has been forced into action as they’ve experienced some adverse times. Clearly, this isn’t Saab, and by entering markets that consumers are buying in, Volvo can experience revitalization, but there’s a lot of work ahead of them.

Right now, there are no official plans to reintroduce the Volvo S40 to the United States. While Top Gear did report that the S40 was in future plans, it appears that the compact sedan isn’t a top priority at this time. However, taking on the Audi A3 and Mercedes Benz CLA would be a wise move, as they also can offer the V40 and XC40 variants to appeal to consumers in that market.

The next few years should be interesting, and it will be exciting to see what will be coming out of Sweden, Ghent, and the United States factories by 2018.

Volvo Building Manufacturing Plant In The United States

So much for all the concerns and drama over Chinese-made Volvo’s invading dealership lots stateside in a few years. Volvo has recently announced that they will be building a manufacturing plant in the United States. Very little has been released on what models will be manufactured there, but with all the hype surrounding the Swedish automaker after the new XC90’s debut, and their five year plan released a few months back, speculation could run wild as Volvo will be introducing new models to their lineup by 2019.

It’s been said that Volvo was trying hard to get a plant built in Mexico, but those plans fell through, leaving the United States as the next best option. Volvo would be following in the footsteps of Mercedes Benz and BMW, who are already producing cars here in America. Most notably, the BMW X-series is made in the United States. Volkswagen has also moved some of their production to our side of the Atlantic Ocean as the mid-sized sedan Passat is made in Tennessee.

Volvo has plans of reintroducing the S40, leaving the door open for a V40 debut, while also adding an XC40 to the lineup by 2019. The S60/V60 and XC60 will be seeing major changes and will be built on a new platform, raising speculations that maybe these will be some of the cars that will be manufactured here. Depending on when this plant gets built, one could also speculate the all new S90/V90, the new flagships for the automaker, could be made in the United States. BMW and Mercedes Benz manufacture some of their bigger models in the US, so why not Volvo?

The Swedish automaker is going to be busy the next five years, and with a new chief executive for North America, Volvo looks to be more aggressive heading into 2020 to compete with other luxury brands in their market.

Volvo On The Verge Of Revamping Their Lineup, New Models By 2019

Volvo, the usually very conservative auto manufacturer, is now a few years away from having a completely new lineup. Some new models will be introduced to the United States by 2019. The S80 will be replaced by the S90/V90, and the S60/V60 and XC60 will all be completely redesigned by 2018. With major changes underway, this adjustment in the lineup is very similar to a pro sports team rebuilding for the future to contend with powerhouses. Unlike their Swedish counterpart, Volvo has learned from Saab’s mistakes and they plan on taking the world by storm with a completely new look.

The unveiling of the new Volvo XC90 was just the beginning of the changes we’ll be seeing in the next four years. Even years after Ford’s sale of Volvo, the S60/V60 and the previous generation XC90 are all using Ford platforms. Starting this year the Swedish automaker is moving in a new direction, a path that is purely theirs, offering unique vehicles to consumers. The real question is, will Americans be enticed by what Volvo will be offering them in a few years?

Right now Volvo is playing catch-up in the automotive world. While Mercedes Benz and BMW are expanding every year, Volvo has maintained a minimal number of models the past three years. The S40, V50, C30, and C70 are no longer in production, leaving the company out of some major growing markets. While Volvo needed to change things around, getting rid of the compact S40 may have been a mistake to some degree as Audi and Mercedes Benz introduced the A3 and CLA two years later. Not to mention other luxury brands who have entered the small sedan market and created market share for themselves.

By 2019 however, we’ll be seeing the S40 making a reappearance to the United States, along with the V40, and all new XC40. With companies like Mazda making the CX-3, Audi producing the Q3, and BMW selling the X1, Volvo is already behind in the small crossover market. The XC60 is the closest thing Volvo has to a crossover, and while it’s the companies best seller, it’s still not selling enough to compete with the likes of other auto brands who are making smaller and more affordable crossovers. That’s where the XC40 comes in. Early reports suggest it should be priced around $30,000 when it hits the US market in 2019

2014 Volvo S60 T6 R-Design
qJake / Foter / CC BY-SA

The S60/V60 and XC60 will be completely redone by 2018 with the XC60 getting a new platform and look in 2017. Still influenced by Ford, Volvo is doing as much as they can with the S60/V60 and XC60, and for the time being it’s working. Moving ahead, Volvo has to make these changes to distinguish themselves from the rest of the pack.

The S90/V90 will be the new flagship for Volvo. Sharing the same platform as the XC90, Volvo’s first order of business is the large sedan market. It’s actually a bold strategy as other car companies are going smaller, putting small sedans and crossovers as a top priority. The XC90 definitely needed a new look to attract consumers, and by the looks of it the SUV is making a huge splash already.

However, has the lineup change come too late? Has Volvo waited far too long to offer a new S40/V40, or introduce a smaller sibling of the XC60? Every other auto brand is lightyears ahead in terms of adding more vehicles to lineups and giving the consumer more variety. Volvo finds themselves among some very worthy and tough competitors, and with Lexus, Infiniti, BMW, Mercedes Benz, and Audi duking it out, is their room for one more in a very heated auto market? These are the questions that are worth asking.

Saab’s changes came way too late in the game. Is Volvo the next Swedish automaker to make adjustments at the wrong time? Volvo’s have always been special, offering a comfortable ride that very few car companies could match. The direction their moving in is necessary to survive, but how close are they flirting to flatlining? The competition is steep, and a lot can happen in a few years. New markets may emerge, the small sedan and crossover classes could become saturated, or other auto brands replicate what made Volvo so successful.

Volvo’s lineup changes will be exciting to watch nonetheless. It’s going to be refreshing to see new models coning out of Stockholm, and hopefully with a revamped lineup, we’ll see the Swedish auto maker dominate once again.

Volvo Has Made Great Cars Over The Years And That’s A Problem

When you think of Volvo, safety, reliability, and the famous steel cage probably come to mind which is a good thing, especially for a car manufacturer. However, these three qualities have created a dilemma for the Swedish auto maker that is becoming detrimental to the company as the years have passed. Next time when you’re commuting and notice a Volvo, are they new, or six to seven years old? Most likely, the answer would be the latter. Having noticed this every morning, it’s become apparent that Volvo owners are too loyal to their older cars, and not going to the dealership to trade them in.

In 2012, Volvo ranked 1st in owners who keep their old cars the longest. On average, Volvos stay with one owner for over 7 years before they’re traded in, and more astonishing, only 30% of those trade ins were to buy another Volvo. Brand loyalty is down considerably, despite the Swedish auto maker manufacturing better, more modern vehicles that should be appealing to younger buyers and not the 50 somethings. What is the underlying issue though, and how can Volvo get back what they’ve lost over the past 15 years?

The biggest problem is that Volvo owners have no reason to visit a dealership unless it’s for a routine checkup or oil change, because their cars don’t break down or have any mechanical failures that other manufacturers experience. Because of this, consumers aren’t seeing the new models in the showroom, or aren’t even exposed to newer Volvo’s. As an owner of an S40, I can attest that it’s extremely difficult to think of owning a different car or a newer Volvo, and having seen and talked to other owners both in person and on Facebook, I’m not the only one who can’t part ways with his or her sedan. Most of the photos that are shared on social media are all Volvos made prior to 2010, and surprisingly, there appears to be more love for the older S60 design than the current one, which in my opinion, the 2014 S60 is a work of art.

Another reason some Volvo owners may hold onto their cars is because their models are no longer in production. The C30, C70, S40, V50, and V70, to name a few, are no longer being made or sold in the United States, and while for some auto manufacturers that’s not a problem, for Volvo, the owners of these cars are attached and are more likely going to continue putting money into their vehicles.

Volvo dealerships need to attract consumers, whether they’ve owned previous Volvos, or are first time buyers to the brand. The new look S60 and V60 are great cars, and with the AWD options, turbocharged engines, and the comforts of a luxury vehicle, these cars could easily sell if they could get owners of older Volvos to consider trading them in. For some manufacturers, they need to stop thinking conventional, and start looking outside the box and reach new customers. Right now, Volvo and many other auto brands aren’t doing that. Volvo is not Saab (thank goodness), but if they don’t start getting people into dealerships’ doors, they’ll be looking down the same road as their Swedish counterpart.

Products for your Volvo S40

Volvo S40
Volvo S40 in the sunlight

With the summer right around the corner, now is the time to buy some products for your Volvo S40, both for the interior and exterior.

1) Sunshade for VOLVO S40 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 HEATSHIELD Windshield Custom-fit Sunshade

  • Custom-fit sunshade – MADE IN USA!! Endorsed by the Car Pro, Jerry Reynolds!
  • Rolls up with a velcro tie when not in use
  • Comes with a Heatshield Logo so you know you are receiving a genuine “Heatshield Product”
  • 2nd Generation S40
  • PRODUCT DESCRIPTION: HeatShield – Advanced Windshield Reflector HeatShield is an automotive windshield reflector, “sun shade,” or “sun visor,” custom designed to fit the shape of each car model’s windshield. The HeatShield material is simple and unique. A special metallized polyester film, laminated to a thin layer of closed-cell foam, with a clear polyester film back. HeatShields are custom cut using the latest in computer-aided cutting technology. Then they are sewn around the edge with a cloth binding. So HeatShields are reflective, insulating and custom fit for every car. INSTALLATION HeatShield installation is easy and quick. Lay the Heat Shield across the dash. Lift up to the windshield. Drop the sunvisors for support HeatShield is stiff enough to be supported by the sunvisors alone, but it is flexible enough to be bent around the mirror. Once installed, HeatShield will reduce the interior temperature at the dashboard by as much as 40 deg. F. (25 deg. C.) HeatShields are simple to use, but they are just as easy to store! PRODUCT STORAGE When not in use, store your HeatShield like this: Lift sunvisors and pull HeatShield down. Roll up from end to end. Wrap the attached Velcro strap

This will help keep your S40 cool during the hottest days in the summer, which in-turn will allow you to use less of the AC, saving you some dollars at the pump.

2) OxGord 17pc Tan Flat Cloth Seat Cover Set for the Volvo S40 Sedan, Airbag Compatible, Split Bench, Steering Wheel Cover Included

Includes: (2) 3pc Bucket Seat Set Including Head Rest Covers, (1) 2pc Bench Seat Set, (1) Bench Bra for 50/50 or 60/40 split bench option, (3) Rear Seat Head Rest covers, (4) Seat Belt Pad Protectors, and (1) Steering Wheel Cover
Protects your vehicle’s seats from every day wear and tear with a comfortable mesh fabric
Simple installation – no tools or professional experience required
Easy to clean, just throw them in the washing machine
Fits year(s): 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

The Volvo S40 2.4i: 2 Tons Of Swedish Magnificence

The Volvo S40 2.4i: 2 Tons Of Swedish Magnificence

Being an owner of the Volvo S40 has been an absolute pleasure. The comfort level, style, and feel of luxury is what makes this car so great. It’s a Volvo. Should we expect anything less?

At the height of it’s sales back in 2006, the Volvo S40’s starting MSRP was roughly around $25,000. However, for the price paid for it, you got a lot more than what the competitors were offering. A sunroof, power windows and locks, 16″ aluminum rims, and climate control.
The interior was clean and open, and for a compact sedan, you didn’t feel entirely close to you front seat passenger as shoulder room was quite impressive. Radio and temperature controls took time to get used to, but in the open backside, there was an added cargo space and a neat feature that hadn’t been seen in other vehicles.
With a five cylinder engine that supplied 168 horsepower, you never felt too underpowered and could always rely on the S40 to get you out of tricky situations. From 0-60 it took 8.1 seconds, but let’s remember, it’s a Volvo, and unless you bought the T5, there was no turbo charged engine. Fuel economy could have been better, but if only used on the highway the S40 had the potential to close in on 300 miles on a tank of gas. Premium unleaded always hurts the pocket, however the miles and hours spent driving are well worth the price.
Overall this car was and still is nice. For students and young adults it can be the prelude to bigger and better vehicles, but it’s hard parting ways with a small sedan that introduces you to luxury. Cargo space for the Volvo S40 isn’t the best for it’s class, but that’s not what this car was meant for. The drives on a beautiful warm day with the sunroof open and the windows down is what creates the lasting memories. This car is great to cruise around in and not feel uncomfortable while sitting in it.
Volvo got it right when they produced the S40, and if they ever decide to reintroduce it to their lineup, there would be no hesitation, I will buy it.